Meet Our Senior Associates

Dr. Rochelle Johnston

has worked with communities affected by violence in Eastern Africa, the Middle East and North America for the past 20 years, mostly in collaboration with children and youth.

Nidhi Kapur

is a child protection and gender specialist with over ten years of field-based experience. Motivated by a strong interest in the complexities of protection programming in conflict and post-conflict zones 

Hannah Thompson

has 18 years of experience as a manager, technical adviser, and consultant in supporting programmes in complex emergency, natural disaster, and developing country contexts.

Dr. Timothy Williams

is a specialist in the study of childhood, youth and international development. Areas of expertise include child protection, education, political economy, and human trafficking.

Dr. Laura Lee

is a scholar practitioner in global child health. Laura has more than 15 years of experience in strengthening global child, adolescent and youth health programming, protection and services in adversity settings. 

Claire Whiting

has over 12 years of experience as a humanitarian practitioner delivering technical, advisory, coordination and senior management roles in humanitarian, early recovery and development contexts 

Hannah Thompson

has 18 years of experience as a manager, technical adviser, and consultant in supporting programmes in complex emergency, natural disaster, and developing country contexts. Hannah has worked in 22 countries, and lived in 14, throughout South and South East Asia; West, East, Central and North Africa; Europe; and the Middle East. Her work has concentrated on child protection, sexual and gender-based violence, and education. With specific technical expertise in: family, social and economic reintegration; psychosocial support; community-based mechanisms; case management; systems strengthening; promoting gender equality in education; and the prevention of violence in schools. Her competencies include needs assessment; programme strategy development, planning and set-up; staff and partner selection, management, capacity building, and wellbeing; training development and workshop facilitation; developing best practice guides and programme tools – including for monitoring and evaluation; and research with children, communities and other stakeholders - including on highly sensitive issues. She works according to the principles of collaboration, participation, equality, and respect for diversity. This applies to the way she treats colleagues and team members as well as her approach to clients and affected populations. Hannah has a Masters in Anthropology and Development – with a focus on kinship and gender – from the London School of Economics. For her LinkedIn profile, click here.

 

Dr. Rochelle Johnston

has worked with communities affected by violence in Eastern Africa, the Middle East and North America for the past 20 years, mostly in collaboration with children and youth. In leadership and technical roles, working for a range of international organizations, NGOs, governments and academic institutions, she has delivered expertise and programs on protection, child rights, gender, displacement, genocide, informal education, livelihoods, peace building, M&E, social innovation and advocacy. Having facilitated and documented youth-led and parent-led movements in nine countries, Rochelle is a passionate advocate for participatory process. She is pioneering the use of relational methods to understand and engage with complex and power-laden systems, from the internal and micro, to the global. Her action research aims to decolonize and indigenize humanitarian, development and human rights work. Rochelle is a Research Associate at the School of Global Studies, University of Sussex and Adviser for the Jordanian organization Sawiyan. She has a MEd from Harvard University and a PhD from the University of Toronto. Her co-edited book, Indigenous Research: Theories, Practices, and Relationships was released this year.

 

Dr. Laura Lee

is a scholar practitioner in global child health. Laura has more than 15 years of experience in strengthening global child, adolescent and youth health programming, protection and services in adversity settings. Specializing in community-based participatory research methodologies, gender, child protection and participation, social justice and health equity and participatory program planning and evaluation, she has designed, implemented and analyzed research projects with children and youth in various countries in East and Southern Africa, Asia, the Middle East, and North and South America. In 2015, she obtained her PhD from University of British Columbia (UBC) for her work on the sexual health of young women heading households in Nakuru County, Kenya. She holds an MSc in International Health (Queen Margaret University, Edinburgh, 2006) for her thesis focused on community-based responses to strengthen the psychosocial wellbeing of child-headed households in Rwanda. She is an Adjunct Professor at the UBC in the Faculty of Medicine, teaching program planning and evaluation and topics around global health. In the Faculty of Health Sciences at Simon Fraser University, Laura has participated in HIV research with youth in South Africa and has been a sessional instructor. Contractually she has worked with the International Institute of Child Rights and Development (IICRD), Queen Margaret University, World Vision, Terre des hommes (Tdh), Provincial Health Services Authority, and Vancouver Foundation, most recently exploring the role of sports (IICRD, Tdh, UNHCR and the International Olympic Committee) and the arts (IICRD, Tdh) in the protection and psychosocial wellbeing of youth in migration and adversity settings.

 
 

Dr. Timothy Williams

is a specialist in the study of childhood, youth and international development. Areas of expertise include child protection, education, political economy, and human trafficking. Tim received his Ph.D. in international development from University of Bath, his MSc in public health from Harvard School of Public Health, and his MSW from Boston College School of Social Work. In 2017, he completed a postdoctoral fellowship at Harvard Graduate School of Education. Tim has done work for the Brookings Institution, the World Bank, the International Organization for Migration, Save the Children, and community-based groups. He has published extensively about childhood, education, and international development in post-genocide Rwanda. His paper on education policy in Rwanda, published in World Development, received the 2018 Joyce Cain Award from the Comparative and International Education Society of North America. Tim is currently under contract to write a book on this topic that will be published by Cambridge University Press.

 

Nidhi Kapur

is a child protection and gender specialist with over ten years of field-based experience. Motivated by a strong interest in the complexities of protection programming in conflict and post-conflict zones, Nidhi has worked for a number of international organizations including the British Red Cross, Save the Children, War Child UK, the Handicap International Federation, Plan International and Right to Play. As part of emergency response teams, she has been deployed to various countries including Liberia, South Sudan, the Democratic Republic of Congo as well as Israel and the occupied Palestinian territories. Nidhi has worked on a multitude of issues with and on behalf of children, including gender-based violence, sexual exploitation and abuse, as well as disability inclusion. She studied International Relations at the University of Toronto, and subsequently completed her Masters degree at the London School of Economics, specializing in the course and consequences of the Rwandan genocide. Having lived and worked across the globe, East Africa has been home since 2008. Nidhi is based full-time in Kigali, Rwanda where she continues her national, regional and international work.

Claire Whiting

has over 12 years of experience as a humanitarian practitioner delivering technical, advisory, coordination and senior management roles in humanitarian, early recovery and development contexts with Non Government and United Nation Organisations and in close collaboration with national and local authorities. A child protection, participation and rights specialist by education and training, Claire broadened out into humanitarian and inter-agency coordination, leading inter-agency coordination and advocacy efforts on behalf of INGO’s and vis-à-vis host governments/actors and international organisation counterparts – at national, regional and international levels. Claire has specific knowledge and expertise in child rights; participation – linked to the engagement of children and young people in decision making, research, policy and practice; prevention and response to violence against children; case management and systems building; psychosocial support; unaccompanied and separated children; disarmament, demobilisation and reintegration of children associated with armed groups; community based mechanisms; child safeguarding; life Skill approaches; child led advocacy; humanitarian action in the context of displacement, conflict and natural disasters; humanitarian financing; humanitarian coordination; interagency coordination; humanitarian access; humanitarian policy and practice; and safety and security. Core skills include research; assessment; evaluation; development of tools, policies, and guidelines; development and delivery of trainings and capacity building; facilitation; alliance building, networking and negotiations; and evidence based advocacy/ humanitarian diplomacy. Claire has lived and worked in 12 countries across East Africa. Asia, the Middle East and Europe. She holds a Post Graduate Diploma in Humanitarian Diplomacy from The Diplo Foundation and IFRC, an MSc by distinction in Childhood Studies from the University of Edinburgh, and a BA First Class Hons in Psychology form the University of Bristol.